This course aims to provide the students with an in depth-overview of the field of International Security in the Post-Cold War Era.

The first part focuses on concepts, general approaches and theoretical frameworks of international security in today’s world. Part One of the course thus aims to:
• familiarize students with the development of Security Studies;
• challenge students to compare and evaluate the major traditions in the thinking about international security;
• encourage critical reflection on the present state of security in the world;
• improve research and writing skills through a variety of assignments (link with Part II and III of the course).

The second part of the course tries to get an overall perspective into the main security challenges in the world up to 2030, based upon publications of authoritative institutions. The Global Risk Reports of the World Economic Forum points to Economic, Environmental, Geopolitical, Societal and Technological challenges (which we will compare with the latest version). The Global Trends 2030 Report of the US National Security Council identifies Megatrends, Game-Changers and Potential Words. Part Two of the course thus aims to:
• familiarize students in general terms with the variety of security challenges, their complexity and inter-relatedness.

The third part of the course focuses on an analysis of the national security policy and geostrategy of some of the main actors and countries involved in the Syrian crisis. Students will (learn to) analyse, with the help of the concepts and schools of thought from the first part, the national security policy and geostrategy of these countries. The insights we gather are debated in group. Part Three of the course thus aims to:
• learn students apply concepts and theories of security studies and international relations to actual cases;
• develop students’ analytical skills in questions of current security studies;
• encourage students to debate their findings.

The fourth part of the course discusses the widening and broadening of security in today’s world; from traditional military security to economic security, energy security, environmental security and societal security. We will link these to current issues in today’s international relations. The cases are the following (to be confirmed later); economic security and the French ‘guèrre economique’, energy security in China and India, environmental security: the Aral Lake area and Central Asia, societal security and international migration into Europe’s capitals. The insights we gather are debated in group. Part Four of the course thus aims to:
• learn students apply concepts and theories of security studies and international relations to actual cases;
• develop students’ analytical skills in questions of current security studies;
• encourage students to debate their findings.

The fifth part of the course discusses current topics of international security; weapons of mass destruction (North Korea), regime security, failed states and terrorism: the case of Mali, piracy and the policies of the Anglo-Saxon world (Somalia, Yemen), the introduction of US-drones in Pakistan/Afghanistan, health and security: the case of HIV/AIDS in Southern Africa, cyber security and the United States of America. We will link these to current issues in today’s international relations. The insights we gather are debated in group. Part Five of the course thus aims to:
• learn students apply concepts and theories of security studies and international relations to actual cases;
• develop students’ analytical skills in questions of current security studies;
• encourage students to debate their findings.

The sixth part of the course will look at international negotiation, from a theoretical point of view, but especially also the practical side. The course ends with a negotiation simulation of the UN SECURITY COUNCIL: Towards Security in the Arctic?. Part Six of the course thus aims to:
• learn students to identify and prepare the key elements in the diplomatic negotiating position of the country they defend (position paper);
• train students in developing a strategy to maximize their country’s position within the framework of the negotiation (strategy paper), and adapt it to the reality or dynamics of the negotiation process;
• learn students to convey their ideas to fellow negotiators;
• stimulate students in working in a diplomatic way so to achieve a common result;
• encourage students to evaluate the negotiation process, and their role in it.

Finally, the students reflect on Security Studies as a body of literature and science. The last part of the course thus aims to:
• learn students to appraise Security Studies as a body of literature and science;
• encourage students to evaluate and reflect on their own personal and academic growth and development.

Throughout the course, each week, students will briefly present current case studies of international security in a Weekly Security Analysis. These combine a certain dimension of security in a well-circumscribed geographical area. This part of the course aims to:
• familiarize students with a wide variety of current topics in Security Studies;
• engage students in debating the challenges relations to these issues.